News

Symposium Trafficking in Human Beings

The Hague Peace Initiative organized a symposium on trafficking in human beings with Professor Kevin Bales (University of Nottingham) and Tamme de Leur (MetaStory Institute) on May 25th.
Kevin spoke about the link between trafficking in human beings, war and ecocide. Tamme discussed the situation in the Netherlands and the major challenges we face to combat human trafficking.

Postgraduate course: A multidisciplinary approach to combating human trafficking

The 6th edition of the multidisciplinary postgraduate course starts

17th of October 2018


- Working together to combat human trafficking
- Become a case manager in your own organization
- Gain more knowledge and expand your network

Premiere documentary Safe Havens

The premiere of the documentary Safe Havens will be in Geneva this upcoming October. This is the final event of a 2-year EU-project.

In this project we train Salvation Army staff in Eastern Europe to recognize signals of human trafficking. We also show good practices concerning the care of victims in the region.

Alumni Day 2018 great success

In March we organized our very first alumni day for our alumni post-graduate students. Thank you for your positive feedback!
We discussed case studies with


Henk Werson (human trafficking investigator) and
Els Martens (prosecution officer)


and we were inspired by several TedTalks. At this moment we are looking into the possibility of organizing a day like this, twice a year.

Almost 100 students have chosen minor course on Human Trafficking in 2018/2019

Third and fourth year students of the University of Applied Sciences in Ede have chosen the minor A multidisciplinary approach to human trafficking this year.

Students from the majors
nursing, social work, education, business management, safety science, communication and journalism want to learn how they can fight human trafficking in their own field of work.

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“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.”

Nelson Mandela

We believe in the sustainable impact of education, and we would like to facilitate more organisations. Interested? Click on the smiley to send us an e-mail.

“We are not to simply bandage the wounds of victims beneath the wheels of injustice, we are to drive a spoke into the wheel itself.”

Dietrich Bonhoeffer​

MetaStory Instituut

Our mission

Our goal is to draw attention to socially relevant issues, with a focus on human trafficking.

We strive to make a big social impact in the fight against social injustice.


How often does
it happen?

I don’t see anything of this around me…
Human trafficking is a hidden crime and that's why it’s difficult to measure. In the Netherlands there are an estimated 6250 victims each year but that is only the tip of the ice-berg.

Worldwide there are an estimated 40 million victims.

Why Trafficking Human Beings
(THB)?

There are so many more issues of injustice and other crimes that you can fight against...
Human trafficking is one of the few crimes that touch the human dignity and physical integrity in such a deep and cruel way.

People become products through sexual exploitation, organ trafficking, labour exploitation, forced begging and coerced criminal activities.

On top of that victims of modern slavery often originate from the most vulnerable groups of our society.

Background

We are a team of experts on the issue of trafficking in human beings.
Our team has a diverse background in the field of social work, police, public broadcast, probation, communication and journalism.

Resources

We want to combat human trafficking through education, training and documentaries.

On an international level we participate in European projects and we give advice to NGOs and governments.

What can you do?

Is this not a task for the police, government, social workers and other experts...?
You can play an important part in the fight against human trafficking by learning the signals and reporting suspicious situations.

Also, be aware of the origin of the products you buy, for example look into Fair Trade products.

Even in
the Netherlands?

I know there is slavery in the world, but it doesn’t happen in the Netherlands, right...?

Network

We collaborate with educational institutions, scientists, investigation authorities, NGO’s and international organizations on combating human trafficking.




Our mission

Our goal is to draw attention to socially relevant issues, with a focus on human trafficking.

We strive to make a big social impact in the fight against social injustice.


Why THB
(Trafficking Human Beings)?

There are so many more issues of injustice and other crimes that you can fight against...
Human trafficking is one of the few crimes that touch the human dignity and physical integrity in such a deep and cruel way.

People become products through sexual exploitation, organ trafficking, labour exploitation, forced begging and coerced criminal activities.

On top of that victims of modern slavery often originate from the most vulnerable groups of our society.

Background

We are a team of experts on the issue of trafficking in human beings.
Our team has a diverse background in the field of social work, police, public broadcast, probation, communication and journalism.

How often does
it happen?

I don’t see anything of this around me…
Human trafficking is a hidden crime and that's why it’s difficult to measure. In the Netherlands there are an estimated 6250 victims each year but that's only the tip of the ice-berg.

Worldwide there are an estimated 40 million victims.

Resources

We want to combat human trafficking through education, training and documentaries.

On an international level we participate in European projects and we give advice to NGOs and governments.

Even in
the Netherlands?

Of course there is slavery in the world, but it doesn’t happen in the Netherlands, right...?

Network

We collaborate with educational institutions, scientists, investigation authorities, NGO’s and international organizations on combating human trafficking.




What can you do?

Is this not a task for the police, government, social workers and other experts...?
You can play an important part in the fight against human trafficking by learning the signals and reporting suspicious situations.

Also, be aware of the origin of the products you buy, for example look into Fair Trade products.

Vision

We want to bring positive and sustainable change in our community in the area of social justice. We are doing this through consultancy, training and developing educational courses with a practical benefit for different professions.

We have educated more than 300 students and 100 professionals, resulting in a great amount of initiatives (ripple effect). For example: Wageningen University decided to look into their production chain for modern slavery. Due to our students a better cooperation between social workers and law enforcement in the regions of Arnhem, Utrecht and Friesland takes place. Finally, several vocational schools are now working on prevention programs with regards to human trafficking.

A lot of scientific research is being done, from different perspectives, about modern slavery. But often there is no integrated multidisciplinary framework. Neither is there a translation to the different professions, nor a sustainable implementation of recommendations.

We have been developing the Twelve Challenges Framework, a model which shows the complexity of human trafficking, the challenges from a multi-stakeholder perspective and the importance of an integral approach to combatting human trafficking.

We presented the Twelve Challenges Framework (TCF) for the first time at the conference of the Schuman Centre for European Studies (2016). In this model we use insights from Austin Choi-Fitzpatrick and Louise Shelley, among others.

The TCF is also an elaboration of the barrier model by Alexis Aronowitz who is one of the founders of the barrier model strategy. She approaches human trafficking as a criminal business model that can be combated when different disciplines are working together to provide a negative business environment for criminals.

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Twelve Challenges Framework: our model for a
systemic approach to fighting human trafficking
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Activities

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A conference about human trafficking in Bucharest
on invitation of the Romanian government (Bucharest 2014 and 2015)
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Apart from consultancy, education and training, we also focus on making partnerships with other organisations and authorities. Combating and preventing human trafficking cannot possibly be achieved by one organisation alone. We believe in a multidisciplinary approach where every partner is playing a viable part. That is why we work with governmental institutions and relevant NGOs, at local and international level.

A few examples of our network partners in the Netherlands are:
CoMensha (Dutch coordination centre human trafficking), the Salvation Army, Ministry of Social Affairs, University for Applied Sciences in Ede, Wageningen University, National Rapporteur on Trafficking in Human Beings and Sexual Violence against Children, International Justice Mission, and the Dutch National Police.

Human trafficking and specifically people smuggling is an international issue, and the only way to combat these crimes is through international cooperation. We have many contacts in the European field and we often work with projects financed by European funds. We are involved in raising awareness, training, seminars and developing international audiovisual educational material.

We have been providing lectures and training for the following organisations: International Centre for Migration Policy Development (ICMPD), European Freedom Network (EFN) and The Salvation Army Europe (TSA).

Postgraduate course Combating Human Trafficking

In our postgraduate course, professionals learn a multidisciplinary approach to the complexity of human trafficking: forced prostitution, labour exploitation, organ trafficking and other forms of modern slavery. The relation to vulnerable groups, politics, religion and culture are also part of the course. Students can apply their knowledge gained in their own field of work. Through this course experienced specialists in human trafficking are able to expand their own knowledge and are able to build a bigger professional network.

The lectures are interactive, making use of short video clips with many up-to-date and practical examples. We have developed a digital learning environment with practice modules, home study assignments, and additional study material.

The postgraduate course is of great value for professional human trafficking experts as well as for volunteers working at local NGOs. Participants work in the field of social work, police, youth protection, labour inspection, the Immigration and Naturalization Office and the Central Office for Asylum Seekers. People with a background in human resources, nursing, law and education have also taken this course.

It’s not just about getting a certificate: during the course the participants organically develop a professional network and we often organize alumni gatherings for our students to discuss case studies and share knowledge and experiences.

The course starts in spring and autumn every year, the next upcoming course is planned to start October 17th 2018 and will consist of nine gatherings every two weeks.

For the schedule and register click here (only in Dutch).
For more information, email Tamme de Leur.

The postgraduate course is only in Dutch, but in the future we also want to make it available in English for foreign students.

Corinne Dettmeijer  – former National Rapporteur on Trafficking in Human Beings and Sexual Violence against Children
Martin Witteveen – Appeals Prosecutor, specialisation International Crimes and Human Trafficking
Ina Hut – Executive Director at CoMensha, the Dutch National Coordination Center against Human Trafficking
Henk Werson – Investigator Human Trafficking and liaison officer Thailand
Gert-Jan Segers –  political scientist and member of parliament
Jeroen Hoogteijling – Executive Secretary, Salvation Army
Warner ten Kate – Dutch National Public Prosecutor for
Trafficking in Human Beings

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Our first postgraduate course gained a
lot of attention from both regional and national media outlets
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Safe Havens project

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Interviewing Simon Häggström, investigator human
trafficking in Sweden; discussing multidisciplinary partnerships
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We are working with the Salvation Army in Europe as a network partner in the EU-project Safe Havens. One of the goals of the project is to start a network of human trafficking specialists in Eastern Europe. Also, the Salvation Army staff are learning to work with partners from other disciplines as well.

The focus of the project is repatriation and care of victims in their own region. There is also special attention for minors in the Roma community.

An important part of the Safe Havens project is a documentary which will be used as educational material. This documentary was filmed in Moldova, Sweden, the Netherlands and Ukraine. It shows how organizations are working together to combat and prevent human trafficking.

Good practices, interviews with victims of human trafficking and human traffickers, cultural aspects and the different kinds of modern slavery are part of this film.

In March 2018, as part of the project, we welcomed participants from Moldova, Georgia, Russia, Ukraine, Romania, Hungary, Latvia and Greece to the Netherlands. We took them to the Red-Light District in Amsterdam and Groningen, the ReShare facility in Utrecht and the Salvation Army’s youth protection and probation department in Utrecht. In Ede they followed lectures on topics such as forced labour, criminal exploitation, human rights and how to work in a multidisciplinary setting.

It was a very special experience for the participants to meet each other in the Netherlands. They learned new methods to enable them to fight human trafficking, as case managers, in their own countries.

Minor course Combating Human Trafficking

We discovered there was almost no attention for human trafficking in Dutch schools and universities, even when this type of criminal activity affects almost every professional. That is the reason why in 2014 we developed a minor course (subject of choice for third and fourth year students) for the University of Applied Sciences in Ede.

In a very short time the minor received the most student applications and was the highest rated course across the university. At this point we have already educated more than 300 students. These students majored in nursing, social work, safety science, creative therapy, education, business administration, communication and journalism.

The minor is a 15 EC (European Credit) course (previously a 7,5 EC) and it has a very practical focus on all types of human trafficking (sexual exploitation, labour exploitation, organ trafficking, forced begging and forced criminal activities). At its centre is always the question: what does this mean for me personally and in my field of work? The students have to work on a final assignment which is relevant to the topic and could be used practically. The way they do this, can be decided by the students themselves (film, game, reportage, research, etc.).

The lectures are highly interactive with lots of time for comments and questions. Field trips and guest lectures are also an essential part of the course. A guest lecture from Alex Ransdorp (senior criminal investigator) and the story of a human trafficking victim always leave a deep impression on the students.

At the end of the course students often say: “I can’t look at the world in the same way any more”.

Through the subject of human trafficking they become more aware of topics such as: sexual morale, physical integrity, psychology, labour ethics, politics, rights, culture, religion, types of prejudices, organ donation and gender issues. A multidisciplinary approach is demonstrated to be important when dealing with refugees and minorities. Students are also made aware of the ethical dilemmas faced by members of the press, law officers and health care staff. On all these aspects the students are challenged to look at themselves and to form an opinion based on facts. 

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Students preparing for the lecture
have a quick look at the book Fatale Fuik
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Television and video

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trailer 'Sex delivery', reportage about
illegal and forced prostitution (2012, Dutch National Television)
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In 2000 Tamme and Oscar (both working for Dutch National Television) got involved in the making of a documentary about slavery in Sudan. This experience touched them in such a profound way that they started to do more and more research into modern slavery.

They ended up not only making several television programmes about this issue, but they also developed courses, training programmes and a network of professionals in the field.

In 2014 we developed education and film material about the reporting code for domestic violence and child abuse. The course received a positive review from Movisie:

“The combination of video material and a practical teaching environment works very well. The images stay with you and the different steps in the reporting code are very clearly presented. The instructions provide inspiration for trainers and focus on sharing knowledge, practicing skills and reflection. It’s recommended for everybody who is involved with prevention and/or training regarding the reporting code.”

In the framework of a European exchange programme “Frontline” Swedish and Dutch police officers and social workers visited each other’s countries (2013/2014). We filmed this exchange in Sweden as well as in the Netherlands. The goal of the project was to learn from each other and establish the best practices regarding combating human trafficking.

The legal models in the Netherlands (legalized prostitution) and in Sweden (where prostitution is prohibited) are very different from each other, yet it appears that professionals can learn a lot from each other.

Contact

Tamme de Leur

director
expert human trafficking
international keynote speaker
Background

Social worker and probation officer

Lived and worked in Stockholm for 6 years; project leader social and welfare work for youth, drug addicts and prostitutes

Film director, innovator and commissioning editor for Dutch National Television

Lysette Klop

lecturer
expert human trafficking
senior project leader
Background

Former police officer in the South of the Netherlands

Lived and worked for 7 years in Latvia leading a project for women in prostitution

Member of RescueNet International First Response Global Disasters, in charge of security and communications

Esther Vlot

lecturer
expert human trafficking
project leader
Background

Social worker

Project worker Home of Change

Humanitarian Aid Worker - refugee camps Greece

Oscar Pathuis

curriculum development
e-learning
video specialist
Background

Journalism and Public Relations

International documentaries and television programmes

Book publishing, ICT and marketing

Mailing address

MetaStory Instituut
Wessel Ilckenstraat 13
3813 ZB Amersfoort
The Netherlands

KvK 56735650
RSIN 852287203
IBAN NL43TRIO0776497359 Triodos

We are working from different locations through the Netherlands, mainly in the region Amersfoort, Ede and Rotterdam